Up From The Ashes


Last Easter weekend, Barbadians were happy to see the return of the Flying Fish.  The local delicacy had for quite some time become a scarcity, and an expensive acquirement to pair up with Cou-Cou, the national dish of Barbados (Cou-cou and Flying Fish).  As I recall from my childhood, during the annual four-day holiday Easter break, most Bajans would opt to serve a fish dish.  Back then the top choice would have been flying fish, or some other fishes like dolphin (mahi-mahi), red snapper, and marlin.  Well, it was reported that the local fishermen brought in catches they had not seen in over 20 years.  It was a welcomed surprise and most took advantage of it.  The price became a bit more affordable, and the hope was and maybe still is, that the Flying Fish has finally returned to our waters again.

Now this weekend in Barbados, daylight hours are as dark as night.  Due to the eruption of La Soufriere volcano in St. Vincent, black ash-laden clouds cover the skies over Bim.  St. Vincent is our closest island neighbor, 100 miles away.  Family reports and videos show ash falling like rain, and everywhere the sooty residue can be seen on homes, vehicles, streets, plants, and trees.  With the return of the flying fish last weekend and eruption of the volcano this weekend, makes me wonder if the two are not related.  Is it just a coincidence or is there more to it?

It is often said, animals, and maybe fish too, respond to natural occurrences by behaving in strange ways, for example, four-legged animals tend to climb to higher ground especially before an earthquake happens.  I do not know if there is any scientific explanation to back this up.  I have only read the Biblical account of the world-wide Flood when the animals went into Noah’s Ark for safety.  Maybe we should pay more attention to what the animals are doing 😊. 

The people of St. Vincent are probably feeling like they are in hell (no pun intended), as the lava creeps down into villages and gobbles up everything lying in its path.  As usual, my countrymen have opened their doors to welcome those affected and displaced because of this disaster.  I know it is the thought of many, including my family members, who thinks the inconvenience of the ashes is no comparison to the loss our neighbors are experiencing at this moment. 

Both Barbados and St. Vincent are tropical isles that depend on tourism as their livelihood.  The volcanic activity may negatively impact the draw of visitors to these shores in the coming weeks and months ahead.  As an itinerary planner, I would still recommend for the future, and when the dust settles (pun intended), that you check out both islands and consider adding them to your destination bucket list if it is not there already.   Setbacks are a part of life, and while you may have had plans to visit either place at its best showing, your plans do not have to be a dream cancelled, it can be a dream deferred.

Community Peeps, have you ever travelled to a country after a natural disaster?  It may not be the prettiest sight but over time people usually tend to rise from the ashes and build back better.  Big island in Hawaii, for example, though covered with hardened lava in some parts is still a beautiful place to visit.   Obviously, Barbados will recover from the cascade of ashes faster after a good dowsing of rain, but the impact and recovery our neighbor faces will be for the long haul.  Do any of you adventure seekers have immediate plans to visit either of the two islands in the aftermath, or in the near future?  I would like to hear if you are planning to go and how you plan to handle the situation.  Share your thoughts in the comment box below.

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More times,

Itinerary Planner

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