The Weather Variable


Summer is swiftly approaching and lots of people will take the opportunity to catch the sun’s rays on a destination trip they have been planning for months.  Beginning this Memorial Day weekend and continuing through to the Labor Day weekend, we will see travelers from the four corners of the USA using every means of transport to reach their vacation spot, nationally and internationally.  Whether making a solo or family and friends’ trip, there are some things one should consider before departure.  One such consideration should be the weather variable.  When making plans, a knowledgeable understanding of the destination’s precipitous weather conditions should be studied to guaranty successful itinerary activities and expectations.

At the height of summer, a few damaging, even deadly weather conditions may take place.  In the Caribbean and Americas there may be hurricanes; in Asia and Africa they are called monsoons.  In the USA, specifically the south and mid-west another natural affliction is tornadoes.  Heat waves and torrential rains also weigh into the injurious mix.  A knowledge of the day’s forecast before take-off to start your holiday is advisable.  Check the weather forecast and advisories daily, and a weekly review leading up to your departure date.

Off peak seasons are the cheapest travel times and they usually happen to be when the weather is not considered to be the very best.  In some of my adventures, I chose to travel during the rainy season.  Of course, I watched and noted the forecast and planned my daily activities to suit.  It has been my experience in places like: Costa Rica, Kuala Lumpur, Paraguay and Panama, I have witnessed torrential rains pour down from the sky like clockwork.  Obviously, residents who are familiar with the season, are always prepared when they leave home by carrying an umbrella, raincoat and boots, if needed.   In one of the aforementioned places, I have had my encounter with changing weather patterns too.  I remember traveling with a friend and it was our first day in Paraguay.  We decided (actually, it was my idea since I wanted to see the landscape), to travel to Asuncion by local bus from the airport.  Clearly, this meant a longer time driving to the city since the bus would pick up and drop off passengers along the way.  By the time we arrived in Asuncion, heavy dark clouds had gathered, and it started to rain.  We were riding in the bus, higher off the ground than most sedans.  I could see motor vehicles trying to maneuver away from the pooling water on the roads but thought nothing of it until it became evident, we were experiencing a flash flood.  The rising water started to lap at and climb the bus steps as we drove along.  Some passengers including myself became alarmed and began to scream about the invading water level.  The bus driver then began to look for steeper roads to pull away from the flooding areas.  The rains soon stopped but not before some cars were left stalled in the murky waters.  That flooding experience can be blamed on poor drainage, inadequate infrastructure, or maybe even global warming, but whatever the cause, it was a close call, one that I do not ever want to repeat.

Community Peeps, vacations are relaxing, fun getaways.  However, we must still consider and respect weather conditions wherever we go.  Be prepared by knowing what the day’s forecast is before setting foot outside your door.  Have you ever been caught in bad weather and felt unprepared?  What did you do?  Please share your experience in the comment box below.

Readers, as usual, I invite you to click follow to receive timely updates, select like to show your love and support.  Share this post on your social media site.  Write your comments in the box below.  Your interest, time and attention are always appreciated.  Thank you for reading.

More times,

Itinerary Planner

 

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